Abstract

While the issue of robot child care is obviously of critical importance, an appraisal will not benefit either the field or society if it unrealistically exaggerates a threat, any more so than if it unrealistically trivialises danger. Thus while I largely concur with Sharkey and Sharkey (hereafter S&S) on many substantial and important points, I find it necessary to write a commentary critical of their primary outcome. To explain why robots are unlikely to cause significant psychological damage to children, I will begin where S&S end, with the legal framework in which commercial child-care robots will be marketed. From this I will look at the likelihood of deception — both commercial deception through advertising and self- deception on the part of parents. Finally I will reexamine the probability of psychological damage to children.


Type

Journal Article

Volume

11

Date

2010-07-06

Creators

Bryson, Joanna J. (Author)

Issue

2

DOI
10.1075/is.11.2.03bry


Professional Fields
    
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