Abstract

This article argues that the organization of destruction requires the same level of attention that organization studies have typically accorded to the organization of production. Taking as its starting point recent debates in the field concerning the embodied character of organizational ethics, the present paper sets out to explore what we might call the contemporary automation of warfare by focusing on the proposed deployment of autonomous robots capable of exercising lethal force while governed by the ethical constraints dictated by the Laws of War. Acknowledging the technical challenges inherent in the development of ethical warrior robots, we propose that the importance of such technological fixes for the management of human conflict primarily lies not in their status as (potentially) functional artefacts but rather in their role as material expressions of the moral and philosophical conflicts haunting Atlantic (post?)modernity.


Type

Journal Article

Volume

36

Date

2015-05-01

Webpage

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Creators

Bloomfield, Brian P. (Author)
Vurdubakis, Theo (Author)

Issue

5

DOI
10.1177/0170840614556922


Professional Fields
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